Apartment with young and uncluttered decoration

This apartment of only 70 square meters, designed by the staff of the Semerene Architecture Interior , Is located in a newly built building in a new district of Brasilia. According to the architect Clarice Semerene, the project was designed to align the need of a young couple for fluid spaces, open to multiple uses, and at the same time translate the lifestyle and personal preferences of the residents. Originally, the property was distributed in well-defined environments, with walls separating the living room, kitchen, service area, two suites and a toilet in the social area. Therefore, the architect prioritized free, multifunctional and integrated areas, adaptable to different everyday scenarios.

1-room-color-wood-floor-shelf-partition

At the entrance of the apartment, it is clear that the barriers between the TV room, dining room, kitchen and service area have been eliminated. A single element divides the space, embraces the kitchen island and becomes the heart of the project, which is the metallic structure of it all.

2-cocina-americana-com-ilha-e-copa-de-techo

The kitchen and service area had their functions reduced to just the essentials. The service area, embedded in the closet, is easily camouflaged and converted into a back panel for the dining room.

3-american-kitchen-with-island-and-chairs-charles-eames 4-shelf-partition-between-living-room-and-kitchen 5-door-panel-home-office

The home-office functions as a reversible environment through a sliding panel, which makes the space flexible and integrable when needed.

6-door-panel-home-office-closed 7-area-of-service-built-open 8-area-of-service-built-in-closed

In the closet, the aluminum sliding door and translucent glass, broadens and gives light to the environment.

9-bedroom-main-closet-open 10-bedroom-main-closet-closed 11-bathroom-1-floor-stamped 12-bathroom-2-floor-stamped 13-home-office-guest-room 14-elevations 15-Elevations 16-floor layout-apt-70m2

Photos: Semerene Architecture - Joana France
Plants: ArchDaily